1. CS: i'm doing comic con stuff at work
    2. i've realized how silly steampunk is
    3. i mean, i knew
    4. but yeah
     
  1. cavetocanvas:

Thomas Cole, River in the Catskills, 1843
From the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston:

At first glance, Thomas Cole’s River in the Catskills may seem like a typical nineteenth-century landscape, but it is in fact unusual among American landscapes of its time. Inspired by British notions of the picturesque found in natural scenery and Cole’s own writings on landscape, River in the Catskills presents an idyllic pastoral world removed from the realities of modern industrialization and urbanization. But one small detail, found upon close inspection of the background, sets it apart: a steam locomotive, an unequivocal symbol of industrial development. This work is considered to be the earliest known American oil painting to depict a train. 
As an uncommissioned work, River in the Catskills stands out among Cole’s several other painted versions of the natural scenery of the Catskills. The artist had moved to the town of Catskill in 1836 with his new wife, Maria Bartow. Over the years he had witnessed the town, also a major shipping port, grow and then decline, with an ultimately unfinished railroad development project that was in process for over ten years. In addition to squandering large sums of money and causing local conflict, the advent of the railroad worried local residents who treasured their familiar natural scenery. It was in this atmosphere that Cole began painting, and thus perhaps preserving, the landscape that surrounded him. Yet River in the Catskills diverges from Cole’s other renditions in its exploration of the tensions between nature and industry. Unlike other versions of the scene, this composition limits the lush greenery and includes the train, along with other markers of encroaching civilization: a collection of houses—probably a town—also appears; steam or smoke rises from the horizon, possibly indicating the presence of another train or a factory. In the foreground stands the scene’s main figure, a man in an eye-catching red coat, holding an axe, amidst a clearing of fallen trees. The attention drawn to the figure raises the question of man’s relationship to nature. Does the path to civilization and its improvements come only at the expense of clearing away the untouched American landscape?

    cavetocanvas:

    Thomas Cole, River in the Catskills, 1843

    From the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston:

    At first glance, Thomas Cole’s River in the Catskills may seem like a typical nineteenth-century landscape, but it is in fact unusual among American landscapes of its time. Inspired by British notions of the picturesque found in natural scenery and Cole’s own writings on landscape, River in the Catskills presents an idyllic pastoral world removed from the realities of modern industrialization and urbanization. But one small detail, found upon close inspection of the background, sets it apart: a steam locomotive, an unequivocal symbol of industrial development. This work is considered to be the earliest known American oil painting to depict a train. 

    As an uncommissioned work, River in the Catskills stands out among Cole’s several other painted versions of the natural scenery of the Catskills. The artist had moved to the town of Catskill in 1836 with his new wife, Maria Bartow. Over the years he had witnessed the town, also a major shipping port, grow and then decline, with an ultimately unfinished railroad development project that was in process for over ten years. In addition to squandering large sums of money and causing local conflict, the advent of the railroad worried local residents who treasured their familiar natural scenery. It was in this atmosphere that Cole began painting, and thus perhaps preserving, the landscape that surrounded him. Yet River in the Catskills diverges from Cole’s other renditions in its exploration of the tensions between nature and industry. Unlike other versions of the scene, this composition limits the lush greenery and includes the train, along with other markers of encroaching civilization: a collection of houses—probably a town—also appears; steam or smoke rises from the horizon, possibly indicating the presence of another train or a factory. In the foreground stands the scene’s main figure, a man in an eye-catching red coat, holding an axe, amidst a clearing of fallen trees. The attention drawn to the figure raises the question of man’s relationship to nature. Does the path to civilization and its improvements come only at the expense of clearing away the untouched American landscape?

     
  2. jesuisperdu:

tom thomson
1916
     
  3. sollertias:

Lystring på Krøderen by Hans Gude, 1851 (detail)

    sollertias:

    Lystring på Krøderen by Hans Gude, 1851 (detail)

     
  4. fleurdulys:

Spring - Stepan Kolesnikov
1909

    fleurdulys:

    Spring - Stepan Kolesnikov

    1909

     
  5. arsvitaest:

Charles Spencelayh (1865–1958), Burning Zeppelin (Cuffley) Sept 3rd 1916, oil on canvasboard 
Thanks to anotherword and blastedheath

    arsvitaest:

    Charles Spencelayh (1865–1958), Burning Zeppelin (Cuffley) Sept 3rd 1916,
    oil on canvasboard

    Thanks to anotherword and blastedheath

     
  6. hobandbudgie:

Berkshire Nightscape by Scott Kahn

    hobandbudgie:

    Berkshire Nightscape by Scott Kahn

    (Source: escapeintolife.com)

     
  7. In one generation, working for free for people who can pay you went from something laughable, to something wealthy people were doing in a few fields, to something everyone was recommended to do, to something almost everyone has to do. Entry-level jobs were replaced with unpaid internships. That same monopoly on opportunity reshaped lower-skill labor. Jobs that once offered on-site training now require college degrees. In response, universities ramp up tuition, knowing that students have little choice but to pay to compete. Instead of options, there is one path to professional success — one exorbitantly expensive path.
    — 

    At PolicyMic, Sarah Kendzior explains why you should never ever take an unpaid internship (but you will nonetheless because you have no choice). (via tarot-sybarite)

    This topic is endlessly interesting to me, as a nonprofit manager, which is why I once wrote a billion words about it…

    (via facebooksexism)

     
  8. theislandofshalott:

Evelyn Nesbit Thaw in a beautiful, feathered chapeau.

    theislandofshalott:

    Evelyn Nesbit Thaw in a beautiful, feathered chapeau.

     
  9. 
Aelbert Cuyp - Cows in a River (clouds detail).

    Aelbert Cuyp - Cows in a River (clouds detail).

    (Source: marieantoinete)